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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
that gave him more latitude with the conservative base of the party. >> woodruff: speak of boston, and other places, let's hear now from our colleagues-- actually, ray suarez is in chicago. he and margaret warner are at the two presidential campaign headquarters, but, ray, we're going to come to you first. are you in chicago, and that's where president obama is tonight. >> that's right. he's just a few miles away. he's not here yet. and neither are a lot of the senior officials from the campaign. i think they probably want to waito see a little bit more, but illinois senior senator, senator dick durbin is here, and there have been a lot of poll closings, a lot of projections, but so far no surprises. what do you need to see before you can really relax? >> some of the key battled ground states-- florida, virginia, ohio, and of course when we get in the midwest, a little closer to my activity in the last few months for the president, taking a look at wis cons and i know iowa. if we can get the job done in the midwest, and i hope we do glie you're not up thisickle. whn you don't have a race, wh
our colleague ray swawrers and hopefully we'll be joined by margaret warner in boston. ray is at the presidential candidate night headquarters in chicago. ray, what is the sense right now? when we talk about this ground game issue, what does the campaign say about what they have over the romney campaign in terms of ground game? >> they said this time instead of sending volunteers and sending field workers from state to state, they concentrated much more heavily on using people that people know. i mean it sounds kind of obvious. but all the research shows that when someone you know talks about you... talks to you about casting the vote in the first place or voting for the person you prefer, that has a lot more impact than somebody showing up at your door with paperwork, a leaflet or a pitch for a candidate. so they've put much more emphasis on having people work their own neighborhoods this time around. and they say they have hit their marks, that they are getting out their numbers. and so far so good. gwen? >> ifill: well, ray, i'm also curious. you're standing there at the
, nancy. jan crawford has been covering the romney campaign. she is in boston tonight. jan? >> well, scott, governor romney just landed here about an hour ago after making campaign stops in that key state of ohio and in pennsylvania. he talked to reporters on the way back on the plane and he said he felt good about this campaign. they hadn't left anything in the locker room and that he thinks they're going to win. he said he just finished his victory speech. he's not written a concession speech. now, the mood inside the campaign tonight, scott, is one of cautious optimism, i'd say. but there is a little bit of nervousness and here's why: campaign sources that i'm talking with tonight say they are encouraged by the high numbers of republican turnout they're seeing in these swing states like ohio, florida, virginia. they believe that will outperform john mccain in 2008. that's the key to this election. they really had to run up the score in those areas. but here's where the nervousness comes in. they're also seeing some of the president's turnout in some of those democratic areas like in nor
roberts was there in boston again today with a recap, john? >> the governor put on a brave face. but he was experiencing bitter disappointment and a long, long road to get where he was. it does go to show that the were accurate in what they were hoying and always happens in every four years. they were looking attractive in closing days, they really weren't. the real question it. broadly divided as the country is and big issues facing us, is this a recipe for grid lock or will it spark dipartisan legislation. mitt romney said he would reach across the aisle and he asked those in charge next year to get something done. >> the nation as you know is at a criticical point we can't risk political bickers and partisanship. we have storeach across the aisle. we look to teachers and professors and county on you to teach and inspire our children with passion and discovery. >> the president pledged to meet with mitt romney to talk about the problems . if the republican party hopes to win back the white house it has work to do. governor romney lost among women and lost the hispanic vote. president
in boston. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks join us with their analysis. >> ifill: jeffrey brown on who's voting and why, plus key congressional races with christina bellantoni and stuart rothenberg. >> woodruff: we get historical perspective from michael beschloss and richard norton smith. >> ifill: and hari sreenvasan shows how you can find the latest results online at our data-driven map center. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. when i was in an accident i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own. with united health care i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from, and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a heal
the obama campaign and boston behind the scenes with romney. to the heated battleground states across the country where this election will be decided and our team tracking your vote everywhere in the crossroads of the world with the crowds in times square. and with our partners from univision in miami plus abc's barbara walters, katie couric and our powerhouse team telling you who's winning and why on this historic night, election night 2012, the stakes so high, the race so close, america's next president decided tonight. it's "your voice, your vote." once again from abc news election headquarters in times square, new york, diane sawyer and george stephanopoulos. >> you are looking at times square, usa, the pulse of the nation. also the crossroads of the world, 182 million people pass through here every year and tonight, it is election headquarters for abc news and we are so glad to have you back with us on this very big night, george. >> we have an entire team right out here with us. our reporters an analysts over on that side of the room, jon karl karl, cokie robert, ron brownstein.
for unity in boston. >> at a time like this we can't risk partisan bickering and political posturing. our leaders have to reach across the aisle to do the people's work and we citizens have to rise to the occasion. >> but will they? can the two sides come together? plus, more women entered the all men's club. mostly men's club. >> you've elected first woman senate from the state of massachusetts. >> a record-setting number of women senators. in new hampshire, the governor, both senators, and the house members, now all women. and they're still counting votes in florida. not again. nine days after sandy's, the east coast is getting another had hit, a powerful nor'easter, threatening to cause new flooding and power outages in the same areas battered by the hurricane. good day. i'm andrea mitchell, the day after, live in new york. what many expected to be a close contest ended as a resounding electoral college win for president obama. after a hard-fought race spanning two years, so what should we now expect from a second term? joining me now for our daily fix, chris cizilla, msnbc contributor
now. >> election not on c-span. live coverage of president obama in chicago and mitt romney in boston. and your reaction, by phone, e- mail, facebook and twitter. look for live coverage beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern. "washington journal" continues. joining us is fred sainz, of the human rights campaign. why is the same sex ballot important? guest: marriage equality has never won at the ballot box. we have four races across the country. we stand a good chance for marriage equality to really be a firm -- affirmed by voters and our country for the first time in history. as a very important one for committed and loving gay and lesbian couples across the country that want nothing more than the freedom to marry. host: what states are involved? guest: the state of washington, maryland and maine. and in minnesota we are fighting a constitutional amendment that would prohibit marriage equality. legislature is in both of those states, they passed a law into effect, and catholic governors in both of those states signed those bills, both of those states have laws that allow citizens to go and re
before a crowd of his own supporters, that were gathered outside his campaign headquarters in boston. >> i have just called president obama to congratulate him on his victory, his supporters and his campaign also deserve congratulations. i wish all of them well. but particularly the president, the first lady and their daughters. this is a time of great challenges for america. and i pray that the president will be successful in guiding our nation. >> paul ryan will return to washington, not as the next vice-president. but he did win re-election to the congressional seat he has held since 1998. >> the g.o.p. will remain in control of the house of representatives, the democrats failing to gets close to the 218 seats needed for a majority. the house speaker john boehner, obviously very pleased to retain his leadership role. >> for two years, our house majority has been the primary line of defense for the american people against a government that spends too much, taxes too much, certainly borrows too much, when it's left unchecked. and in the face of a staggering national debt that threat
. mitt romney of course give a concession speech last night in boston. years a portion. [video clip] >> i believe in america. i believe in the people of america. [applause] and i ran for office because i am concerned about america. this election is over, but our principles and door. i believe that the principles upon which this nation was founded are the only sure guide to a resurging economy and renew greatness. like so many of you, paul and i have left everything on the field, we have given our all to this campaign. [applause] i so wish that i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction, but the nation chose another leader. so ann and i join with you to pray for him in leading this country. you guys are the best. thank you so much. a thank you. thank you, guys. host: and as we continue to take your calls on c-span this morning we will go to henry on our line for democrats in michigan. good morning to you. caller: good morning. you know, this is a glorious morning. and i feel really sorry for the lady in florida. and that guy in new jersey who of just
in pennsylvania. and then another republican from texas also lost his seat. this is an ap story out of boston were the brahney/ryan campaign ended up last night. it says paul ryan will return to the house and resumed his role as budget committee chairman. we want to get your reaction to election 2012. our first call is from barbara in hudson, florida. you are calling on the independent line. for whom did you vote? caller: i voted for obama. at women's rights is a very big thing for me. also, medicare, been age 41 and disabled and also a rape victim -- a rape survivor, i should say. i believe obama has the best thing. i was going for mitt romney at first, but when he brought up the issue is about women's rights, and also with medicare and making a voucher program, and also social security, that is where i went toward obama this year. host: that was barbara in hudson, florida. next is mark from brownsville, texas on the republican line. you are on c-span. of what is your reaction to yesterday's election? disappointed in the way the election happen. i voted for mr. romney. i feel that because of the
with of the boston does is something like he said. -- but the filibuster does is something like you said. a call the pathway to -- host: the pathway to 60 includes an independent from the state of maine who has not said what party he will caucus with. guest: i think it is a good bet he will sit with the democrats. one of our reporters spoke to harry reid, and he called angus king, who i do not think will stay for awhile. the republicans went after anxious -- angus king and the democrats did not endorse. they attack the republicans, but they did not endorse. i think basically harry reid is confident he will be sitting on their side of the aisle. host: mike, new york, democratic caller. dr. fred barnes, the executive editor of the weekly standard will take your questions about the election. we will discuss the vote with the national association of latino elected and appointed officials. and the washington bureau chief with the loss angeles times will look at demographic changes in the electorate. live on c-span every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern. congress returns to washington d.c. next week for a lam
on this gragraduate degree, he is workig at a domestic violence shelter in boston. harvard awarded him the thomas upton scholarship. pierre recently wrote an article about growing up as undocumented immigrant and here what is he said. "i am not a criminal, a monito , a predator, or swung had sits at someone doing nothing meaningful. i care for this country, as well as its sorrows and joys. i am not asking that our government maintain an open-door policy for immigrants. i am simply asking that it give an opportunity to those of us who have proven ourselves." well, pierre is right. america needs young people just like him who love their country and are dedicated to caring for our society's most vulnerable. so what do the american people think about the idea of the dream act? a bloomberg poll found that 64% of likely voters, almost two out of three, including 66% of independents support the policy compared to only 30% who oppose it. by a margin of 2-1 the american people know this is the right thing to do. now we need to pass a comprehensive immigration reform. on our side the negotiating effort wil
kind of, you know, making that commute to boston area and moving from out of state in might have something to do with that swing. >> sure it does. brian, thanks very much. we'll watch new hampshire and the four electoral votes. >> our next battleground stop is colorado with its nine electoral votes. just like ohio, went for barack obama in 2008 after helping george w. bush win the white house in 2004. cnn's kung la is in colorado. are you getting a sense of who has the upper hand? >> reporter: well, the republicans saying they have the upper hand looking at who's actually voted, cast that vote, the republicans are leading by about 25,000 votes but that's not very much of a gap. what we're seeing here in this location i'm standing in, the early voting as you mentioned, kate, is over. but what people are doing is dropping off early ballots. they're -- these are the mail-in ballots. they can drop them off and murphy's law, no one's here but they can drive up, give their ballot to this gentleman and then he'll take the ballot and drop it in this red box. from here, these ballots then
us now from boston, winner of the massachusetts u.s. senate race, senator-elect elizabeth warren. congratulations! >> you know -- >> i'm sorry. i'm so happy for you. >> mika is so giddy, senator-elect. >> i really am. >> i don't know what i'm going to do with her. you can now tell america that it was our kiss at fenway that put you over the top last night. >> that was it. >> what an incredible victory. talk about what's happened to you over the past four years. who would have believed that a boomer sooner would make it to the u.s. senate in massachusetts! >> you know, this has just been amazing. every single part of this. and the most amazing part has been the last year about running for office. you know, massachusetts is a very special place. this one was grass roots all the way. these were people who showed up in living rooms and kitchens and school auditoriums who held signs, who called neighbors, who really made this happen. and they saw this race as a race about what kind of a people we are, what kind of country we're going to build. and they wanted to be part of it. and the
] guest: right now with of the boston does is something like he said. -- but the filibuster does is something like you said. a call the pathway to -- host: the pathway to 60 includes an independent from the state of maine who has not said what party he will caucus with. guest: i think it is a good bet he will sit with the democrats. one of our reporters spoke to harry reid, and he called angus king, who i do not think will stay for awhile. the republicans went after anxious -- angus king and the democrats did not endorse. they attack the republicans, but they did not endorse. i think basically harry reid is confident he will be sitting on their side of the aisle. host: mike, new york, democratic caller. caller: i wanted to focus in on three things i believe the democrats as well as the republicans should do that would move lower country forward. let's start with the republicans -- our country forward. let's start with the republicans. i was there with the perspective of not being mean- spirited. we know it is not going to happen 100%. the republicans think they have good ideas in
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)